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Author Topic: Eying up the Focus ST...  (Read 2106 times)

J dot Miller

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Eying up the Focus ST...
« on: November 06, 2011, 08:31:38 AM »
For years Ford has been teasing us with a turbo charged four cylinder in the US market.  I have seen them at the Carlisle All Ford nationals for at least the last Two years.  But I never see them at the dealer!  Now they say they are going to offer the Foucs ST in the US.  At first it was this month (November) now next year.  Still no official date has been released.

They showed it off in Germany earlier this year...


Rumor has it will have the aluminum turbocharged and direct-injected, 2.0-liter twin-cam 16-valve Ecoboost engine rated around 247 HP at  266 ft-lb torque.  Some say it will be offered with a 6-speed manual transmission with revised gear ratios while others say it will have the new six-speed dual-clutch automatic.

Some features:
  • Torque Steer Compensation System that works in concert with the car’s electric-assist power steering to counteract torque steer.
  • Electronic stability control with three modes: standard, reduced or wide-slip mode, and off. T he car may be equipped with Enhanced Torque Vectoring Control, which is independent of the Torque Steering Control system. This system applies the brakes to the inner wheel in cornering to reduce understeer in both power-on and power-off conditions.
  • Upgraded shock and spring settings
  • One-piece trapezoidal grille opening
  • 18-inch Y-shaped alloy wheels with Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric 2 summer tires
  • Side skirts, rear diffuser vents and a roof spoiler.
  • Possible colors are Tangerine Scream, Performance Blue, Race Red, Oxford White, Tuxedo Black and Ingot Silver.
  • Recaro seats in partial or full leather.

My first complaint is why snow tires in the winter and who no winter package?  I want a car I can drive 360 days a year where I can pass the idiots who play games on the roads!  Will this car have issues in ice and snow?

My other complaint is why place it on the ground?  Low cars are a pain to get in and out of when wearing steel toe shoes and a hard hat...  Plus you can not see past the car in front of you.  One of the best features of the standard Focus is it's height.  You can see father down the road making it a pleasant driving experience.

All I need is straight ahead passing ability.

One will assume that since this is a world car designed to be built almost identical in many countries by  North American SVT Team and European ST team one would thing it will cost less...  But the

Guesstimated price is around $23,000-$27,000.
The 5.4 swap has been called a bad idea, and considered an underpowered considerable waste of time, since 2007.

Nice to see that most don’t think that anymore.
Bondfreak13 07/28/09 09:05 PM

J dot Miller

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Re: Eying up the Focus ST...
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2011, 04:39:31 AM »
I hear a rumor, Ford will show the new 2012 Focus ST at the 2011 LA Auto Show next week.   :freddie: please take to trip to one of your condo's over there and get me some insider information... 
:pilot:
The 5.4 swap has been called a bad idea, and considered an underpowered considerable waste of time, since 2007.

Nice to see that most don’t think that anymore.
Bondfreak13 07/28/09 09:05 PM

J dot Miller

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Re: Eying up the Focus ST...
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2011, 07:26:01 PM »
From media.ford.com states that the 2.0-LITER ECOBOOST GIVES FORD FOCUS ST OWNERS TURBOCHARGED, DIRECT-INJECTED THRILL RIDE

  • 2.0-liter EcoBoost™ in Ford Focus ST will deliver up to 247 horsepower and 250 lb.-ft. of torque using high-tech tools like turbocharging and direct gasoline injection
  • Twin independent variable camshaft timing (Ti-VCT) working with turbocharging and fuel injection maximizes horsepower, torque and fuel economy at all engine speeds, helping eliminate lag and flat spots in power delivery
  • Focus ST powerplant marks another milestone in Ford goal to offer 90 percent of its North American lineup with EcoBoost by 2013



2.0-liter EcoBoost Engine
This unique EcoBoost engine is specially tuned for the new Focus ST to ensure the car gets the world-class performance – and the inspirational sound – expected of it. It also marks the first application of the four-cylinder Ford EcoBoost engine in a high-performance model.
 
“EcoBoost technology has fully lived up to its billing, offering owners power and performance with uncompromised fuel economy,” said Barb Samardzich, vice president of Powertrain Engineering. “Combining EcoBoost with Ti-VCT on a high-performance small car like Focus ST demonstrates our product commitment to yet another audience that perhaps hasn’t shopped Ford in a while.”

Building on proven strategies with new solutions
Compared to the 2.0-liter Ford EcoBoost engine planned for other Ford vehicles, the Focus ST unit features redesigned intake and exhaust systems and a unique engine calibration to deliver the desired level of power and responsiveness.
 
The lightweight, all-aluminum engine design combines three technologies – high-pressure direct injection, low-inertia turbocharging and twin independent variable camshaft timing (Ti-VCT) – to create an advanced combustion system that brings new levels of performance and fuel efficiency to engines in this category.
 
The turbocharger increases airflow in the engine to boost power while direct injection helps enable more efficient fuel burn for better fuel economy. Just like the first-generation EcoBoost engines, the EcoBoost four-cylinder engine will spool up quickly to its maximum torque; in this case, 250 lb.-ft. across a broad rev range – estimated from 2,000 rpm to 4,500 rpm, according to preliminary Ford data.
 
“You get peak torque throughout the majority of the engine’s operating range,” explained Scott Makowski, Ford manager of North American four-cylinder powertrains. “It’s available when you accelerate from a stop or merge onto the Interstate, and drivers don’t have to wait for the rpm to build before they get exhilarating performance. There’s torque – and a lot of it – whenever you need it.”
 
Working with the direct gasoline injection system, a state-of-the-art turbocharger ensures virtually lag-free operation at all engine speeds. In service, the turbo spins at up to 195,000 rpm and is designed for a life cycle of 150,000 miles or 10 years.
 
Traditional turbocharger “whoosh” is mitigated by electronically controlled anti-surge valves that proactively relieve the boost in the intake, which can range up to 16 psi. Careful software calibrations manage the pressures in the intake manifold, and an air-to-air intercooler lowers air temperature before it reaches the engine, resulting in a denser, cooler intake charge.
 
The combustion system has been completely redesigned and re-engineered to take advantage of the EcoBoost system’s increased performance. The cam-driven high-pressure mechanical fuel pump operates at up to 2,200psi – more than 50 times the norm seen in a conventional four- cylinder engine.
 
As demands on the turbocharged 2.0-liter EcoBoost engine are increased, the complex electronic control system responds to maintain optimal combustion, timing and injection duration.
 
On each stroke, seven individual jets on each fuel injector spray fuel directly into the combustion chamber, mixing with the incoming air. By bringing the fuel injector right into the combustion chamber, there’s no delay from the time the fuel is injected to when it’s used by the engine.
 
Plus, because the fuel injectors spray right into the combustion chamber, the injected gasoline evaporates and cools the air that’s been inducted into the cylinder.
 
“Ford’s direct-injection design cools the air right where it’s going to be burned,” said Makowski. “Engine breathing and resistance to detonation, or knocking, are all improved.”
 
The charge cooling also allows the direct-injected turbocharged engine to run a higher compression ratio than is possible on a port fuel-injected boosted engine. The higher compression ratio equals improved fuel economy across the operating range of the engine and more horsepower per liter of displacement.
 
Also aiding engine breathing is Ford’s advanced Ti-VCT. This technology allows precise, variable timing control of both the intake and exhaust camshafts, which control the valve opening and closing events.
 
Ti-VCT technology also helps further broaden the EcoBoost torque curve. Because the Ti-VCT strategy allows the intake valve to be advanced, instant power is delivered when the customer demands it at low speeds. At high speeds, the intake cam is retarded and higher airflow is available, which results in approximately a 10 percent power improvement over non-VCT engines.
 
The ability to vary the overlap between the intake and exhaust valves also leads to better fuel economy – approximately a 3 to 4 percent improvement from this strategy alone compared with non-VCT engines.

The 5.4 swap has been called a bad idea, and considered an underpowered considerable waste of time, since 2007.

Nice to see that most don’t think that anymore.
Bondfreak13 07/28/09 09:05 PM